Thigh

Adductor Longus Tendinopathy

The pain due to adductor longus tendinopathy presents as a pain in the groin or lower abdomen. The pain has usually developed gradually over a period of weeks to months. The injury is most commonly developed in athletes who play sports that involve sprinting, changing directions and kicking and the pain is felt mainly during these activities. The pain is caused by a degenerative change that occurs in the tendon close to, and sometimes including the area on the pubic bone where it inserts. Treatment includes the identification of imbalances of flexibility and strength through the hip, pelvis and lower back and addressing these issues through exercises and manual therapy techniques. Special exercises that are designed to stimulate repair in the tendon are central to effective management. Careful management of the athlete’s training load, in consultation with any coaching staff involved, is also essential to recovering from this injury and being able to return to the previous level of competition.


Attachment of adductor longus to the pubic bone of the pelvis

Hamstring Tendinopathy

The pain due to hamstring tendinopathy presents as a pain in the lower part of the buttock or upper part of the back of the thigh. The pain has usually developed gradually over weeks to months and is mainly felt when running, although it could also be painful to sit on hard surfaces. The pain is caused by degenerative changes that are occurring in the hamstring tendon close to, and possibly including the area where it attaches to the sitting bone (ischial tuberosity). Treatment includes the identification of imbalances of flexibility and strength through the hip, pelvis and lowers back, as well as ensuring appropriate training loads. Special exercises that are designed to stimulate repair in the tendon are also central to effective management.


Attachment of the hamstring tendons to the Ischial Tuberosity (sitting bone)

Musculotendinous injuries of the upper legs

Groin Strain

Pain that develops in the inside of the upper thigh suddenly after a quick or strenuous hip movement (such as slipping, changing directions quickly or kicking) may be due to a tear in the hip adductor muscles. Treatment for adductor muscle strains will differ depending on the extent of the tear. After our physiotherapist determines the extent of your injury, they will help you accelerate your recovery and reduce the risk of recurrence, by using a combination of manual therapy, appropriately progressed exercises and advice regarding gradual return to sport.

Hamstring Strain

Pain that develops in the back of the thigh, suddenly, after a quick or strenuous movement of the hip and/or knee could be due to a strain of the hamstring muscles. Common activities that may lead to a hamstring strain include sprinting and kicking. Treatment for hamstring muscle strains will differ depending on the extent of the tear. Rehabilitation for hamstring strains that truly accelerates your recovery and reduces the risk of recurrence is a complicated process. Our physiotherapist will use a combination of manual therapy, appropriately progressed exercises and advice regarding gradual return to sport. An important part of the rehabilitation process includes agility drills and a staged running programme.

Gluteal Strain

Pain that develops in the back of the buttock region, suddenly, after a quick or strenuous movement of the hip could be due to a strain of the gluteal muscles. Common activities that may lead to a gluteal strain include sprinting and lunging. Treatment for gluteal muscle strains includes a combination of manual therapy, appropriately progressed exercises and advice regarding gradual return to sport. A well designed rehabilitation programme will accelerate your return to sport or work, and reduce the risk of a recurrence of the same injury.

Quadriceps Strain

Pain that develops in the front of the thigh, suddenly, after a quick or strenuous movement of the hip or knee could be due to a strain of the quadriceps muscles. Common activities that may lead to a gluteal strain include sprinting and kicking. Treatment for quadriceps muscle strains includes a combination of manual therapy, appropriately progressed exercises and advice regarding gradual return to sport. A well designed rehabilitation programme will accelerate your return to sport or work, and reduce the risk of a recurrence of the same injury.

Quadriceps Contusion

Heavy impact from a blunt object (or opponent in sport) to the thigh can cause bleeding and swelling between the muscle fibres, which is called a contusion. Common names for this type of injury include a “cork” or a “Charlie horse”. Correct treatment for a contusion begins with immediate rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE). Application of ice should be for 15 minutes at a time. It is important with thigh contusions, to try and maintain the length of the quadriceps with gentle sustained stretches, ensuring that you are not provoking the pain. Physiotherapy treatment for a quadriceps contusion includes a combination of manual therapy, appropriately progressed exercises and advice regarding gradual return to sport. A well designed rehabilitation programme will accelerate your return to sport or work.